Galion men answer charges in Crawford County Common Pleas Court


BUCYRUS — Three men appeared in Crawford County Common Pleas Court on Wednesday.

James Schenk Jr., 25, of Galion, was indicted for violating the terms and conditions of his community control. According to probation officer Mark Alspach, Schenk was found to be in possession of Suboxone during an incident that took place in Galion on April 21.

It was noted that this violation resulted from the indictment on the Suboxone charge.

Judge Sean Leuthold entered a not guilty plea for Schenk and appointed attorney Sebastian Berger to represent him. Leuthold ordered an additional bond of $50,000.

Another Galion man, Derek Snyder, 20, was indicted on a charge of possession of drugs. On March 18, Snyder was allegedly in possession of methamphetamines, a crime punishable with as much as a year in prison.

Leuthold entered a not guilty plea on behalf of Snyder and appointed attorney Sebastian Berger to represent him. Assistant Prosecutor Ryan Hoovler asked for bond of $150,000 on Snyder noting that he’d been in prison multiple times, previously. Leuthold set bond at $100,000.

In other court news this week, Joseph Strickland, 39, of Medina made a general admission of guilt related to violating the terms and conditions of his community control. According to probation officer Mark Alspach, Strickland entered a vehicle in Medina and stole a generator and later was involved an assault.

Strickland appeared in court with his attorney Sebastian Berger.

Leuthold sentenced Strickland to 12 months in prison with credit for jail time served in Crawford County. Strickland attempted to ask Leuthold to give him credit for jail time he had served in Medina.

Leuthold told him: “No way that is going to happen. You don’t get credit in our county for an arrest and time served in another county.”

Strickland told the judge: “You can’t blame a guy for trying, judge.”

Leuthold said that considering the trying day he had yesterday, that he could appreciate the humor of it, but that it wouldn’t work.

By Kathy Laird

Crawford County Now