They got our ‘Attention!’ Area residents fall out for military convoy


Galion residents fall out for military convoy

By Jodi Myers - galnews@aimmediamidwest.com



Photo by Jodi Myers
The original 1919 convoy was actually designed to test “new” military vehicles and “new” auto roads for the effectiveness of moving troops in America. It left Washington D.C. on July 7 and arrived in San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.

Photo by Jodi Myers The original 1919 convoy was actually designed to test “new” military vehicles and “new” auto roads for the effectiveness of moving troops in America. It left Washington D.C. on July 7 and arrived in San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.


Photo by Jodi Myers Hundreds of area residents gathered along Harding Way on Saturday morning to catch a rare glimpse at a special military convoy that made it’s way through town to celebrate the 100th anniversary of an original special military convoy.


GALION — Hundreds of area residents gathered along Harding Way on Saturday morning to catch a rare glimpse at a special military convoy that made it’s way through town to celebrate the 100th anniversary of an original special military convoy. In 1919, to celebrate the victory in World War I, a military convoy traveled across the Lincoln Highway, from the East Coast to the West Coast.

Galion, being located on the Lincoln Highway at that time, was one of the convoy’s stops, as it was in 2009, the 90th anniversary of this special celebration.

“It was really nice, really interesting and good to see,” said Dave Lehman, who was uptown Saturday morning.

“The convoy was really awesome,” said Traci Sexton “I brought my kids out and we all really liked it.”

The Military Vehicle Preservation Association invited its members and their various historical military vehicles to participate in this grand convoy re-enactment.

The convoy is following the original Lincoln Highway route as closely as possible. That route crosses all or part of 11 states from Washington D.C. to San Francisco, joining the Lincoln Highway in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

“It’s a part of history and to know that Galion is here and this was the old U.S. Route 30 I think there is a lot to be said about that,” said Kelly Sautter-Tennant.

This is a Convoy of Historic Military Vehicles — of all eras, from World War I through to current-issue military vehicles. The vehicle roster currently includes old cargo trucks, Harley Davidson WLA motorcycles, staff cars and Jeeps to modern M913 5-ton cargo trucks.

The convoy’s daily stopping points will be many of the same locations as the 1919.

The original 1919 convoy was actually designed to test “new” military vehicles and “new” auto roads for the effectiveness of moving troops in America. It left Washington D.C. on July 7 and arrived in San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.

“We came out today for the parade,” said Ruth Ann Campbell.

“We were uptown having breakfast and we just stayed around to watch the parade,’ added Jeff Campbell. “I thought it was neat and I’ve really enjoyed what Galion has done with veteran signs. I think that is great, I think people really enjoy that. I’ve heard a lot of good comments from people about those.”

At that time, the Lincoln “Highway” was a series of roads with conditions that ranged from poured concrete to tracks across quick sand and alkali mud and across bridges that gave way under the weight of these vehicles. The trip was grueling, and the daily average was 59 miles per day and about 6 miles per hour.

Although he didn’t take part in the convoy Dennis Viers brought his 1945 Willys MB military vehicle to come up and watch the convoy come through town. He said he bought it off Craigs List and has had it a couple years. “I just like military vehicles, I have a couple of them,” he said.

Dwight D. Eisenhower was one of the convoy participants. He later vowed to change the way America built roads, and lived up to his promise by beginning the Federal Highway Administration shortly after being elected president in the early 1950s.

Saturday was a chance for all interested to come out and watch as the convoy followed the original Lincoln Highway, Harding Way, (originally called Main Street and then renamed Lincoln Way in 1913) through town headed west to San Francisco.

”I thought the convoy was really nice,” added Mike Fisher. “I’ve known about it for awhile when they first started advertising for it and I wanted to come out.”

Fisher said he likes history and he actually served in the Army from 1965-1967 as a combat medic.

“I retired from the military and I really have an interested in that (military convoy) and that’s why I came out today,” said Bill Myers.

Karen Palmer also came out Saturday and said she really enjoyed all the military vehicles driving down Harding Way. “I found it on Facebook yesterday and thought it would be something I’d really be interested in. We’ve been waiting for over an hour. We got here around 8:30 a.m., we thought it would be really crowded so we wanted to get a good spot.”

Ray Balmer took video of the event and said he was really impressed with the turnout and the convoy itself.

“I wanted to come out and see the convoy. I’m just into to old stuff and I’m a Patriot Guard Rider and anything to do with the military I support,” Balmer said.

As the convoy made its way through town the drivers of the vehicles interacted with the crowd, waving and saying thank you to all who came out to show support.

Photo by Jodi Myers
The original 1919 convoy was actually designed to test “new” military vehicles and “new” auto roads for the effectiveness of moving troops in America. It left Washington D.C. on July 7 and arrived in San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.
https://www.galioninquirer.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/38/2019/08/web1_Convoy-feature.jpgPhoto by Jodi Myers
The original 1919 convoy was actually designed to test “new” military vehicles and “new” auto roads for the effectiveness of moving troops in America. It left Washington D.C. on July 7 and arrived in San Francisco on Sept. 6, 1919.

Photo by Jodi Myers
Hundreds of area residents gathered along Harding Way on Saturday morning to catch a rare glimpse at a special military convoy that made it’s way through town to celebrate the 100th anniversary of an original special military convoy.
https://www.galioninquirer.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/38/2019/08/web1_Convoy-feature-2.jpgPhoto by Jodi Myers
Hundreds of area residents gathered along Harding Way on Saturday morning to catch a rare glimpse at a special military convoy that made it’s way through town to celebrate the 100th anniversary of an original special military convoy.
Galion residents fall out for military convoy

By Jodi Myers

galnews@aimmediamidwest.com