Community Counseling fundraiser includes, cars, flea market


Proceeds fund programs, events for those who suffer from mental illness

By Jodi Myers - Galion Inquirer



Photo by Jodi Myers
A car show and flea market Saturday in Bucyrus is the largest fundraiser each year for Community Counseling Services. On sale at the flea market were anything from items for the home and antiques to car parts.

Photo by Jodi Myers A car show and flea market Saturday in Bucyrus is the largest fundraiser each year for Community Counseling Services. On sale at the flea market were anything from items for the home and antiques to car parts.


Photo by Jodi Myers For 13 years, Community Counseling Services has had a car show and flea market to raise funds to cover events like dinners and parties for it's clients.


BUCYRUS — On a brisk Saturday morning last weekend, people packed in to see classic cars, shop at a flea market and help those less fortunate during an annual event on the ground of Crawford County Community Counseling.

For the past 13 years, the counseling service has put on the event to raise money to give clients special opportunities to enjoy outings and — at times — holiday parties.

Dustin McMillen, a CPST (Community Psychiatric Supportive Treatment) with Community Counseling, said this is their biggest fundraiser each year, with all proceeds going into an activity fund for people who suffer from some type of mental illness.

“The fund just needs a little more support,” McMillen said. “We provide a summer day trip, we do a Halloween party, we do a Christmas party and this car show and flea market pays for all that.”

“This is our biggest event and it takes about a year to plan and get it together. We love doing it,” he said.

Looking across at the cars lined up in the show, McMillen said they have people come from all over to be a part of the event. “We have people come from Ashland, Sycamore, Mount Gilead, Galion, Bucyrus and Crestline,” he noted. “We advertise on Facebook and take flyers to other car shows … anything we can do to get people here and get the name out there.”

With the flea market, McMillen said anyone could come out and put up a table to sell their wares.

“We have everything from household stuff to antiques. Anything, even car parts,” he said. “It was $20 a spot and you can take up about as much room as you want.”

He noted it was $10 for car show entries, again, with all money going back into the activity fund. “This year we’re selling food, we have event t-shirts we try to sell,” McMillen said.

About 14 years ago, McMillen said the counseling service had a flea market only to try and raise money for a Christmas party. Then, the next year McMillen started working at the agency and he had a vintage car and suggested holding a car show too.

“One thing has led to another and I’ve been doing it ever since,” he said.

Community Counseling Services, McMillen said, is very community oriented and offers many needed services, including free depression screening. “We are getting Third Street Clinic in, we have drug and alcohol counseling services, we have mental health services. We cover all cases.”

Photo by Jodi Myers
A car show and flea market Saturday in Bucyrus is the largest fundraiser each year for Community Counseling Services. On sale at the flea market were anything from items for the home and antiques to car parts.
https://www.galioninquirer.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/38/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_1573.jpgPhoto by Jodi Myers
A car show and flea market Saturday in Bucyrus is the largest fundraiser each year for Community Counseling Services. On sale at the flea market were anything from items for the home and antiques to car parts.

Photo by Jodi Myers
For 13 years, Community Counseling Services has had a car show and flea market to raise funds to cover events like dinners and parties for it’s clients.
https://www.galioninquirer.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/38/2019/09/web1_thumbnail_IMG_1571.jpgPhoto by Jodi Myers
For 13 years, Community Counseling Services has had a car show and flea market to raise funds to cover events like dinners and parties for it’s clients.
Proceeds fund programs, events for those who suffer from mental illness

By Jodi Myers

Galion Inquirer