Guest column: ADAMH services help people help themselves


Special to the Inquirer



For the last three decades, the Crawford-Marion Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health (ADAMH) has worked to support mental health and addiction treatment and prevention services offered to the citizens of Crawford County. Next Tuesday the ADAMH Board is seeking renewal of a levy first passed in 1987, which means the millage has not increased in 30 years. For a Crawford County home valued at $100,000, the cost is $27.12 a year or 52 cents a week — less than the cost of a can of pop.

The levy funds much of the work done by the following organizations: Community Counseling Services, Inc. (CCSI); Maryhaven; Together We Hurt, Together We Heal; Marion-Crawford Prevention Programs/Teen Institute and Junior Teen Institute (TI and JTI); the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI); and Family & Children First (FCF).

According to ADAMH Board Executive Director Brad DeCamp, the Board plans, develops, funds, manages, and evaluates community-based mental health and substance abuse services. It also collaborates with a network of providers, social service partners, and others in the community to identify needs and support for those with a mental illness or addiction disorder. “The services we fund create a safety net for individuals with severe mental illness through medication, case management, counseling, and crisis care,” he stated. “They also provide Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) for those struggling with a heroin or opioid-based prescription medication addiction.” In fiscal year 2017, ADAMH-funded agencies served more than 4,800 people. DeCamp added, “Our work affects over 10 percent of the residents of Crawford County every year.”

When referring to the work of CCSI, Dr. Bradley Fox explains: “We’re in the business of changing and saving lives.” CCSI offers mental health and substance abuse counseling, psychiatric services, the Signs of Suicide (SOS) program in schools, case management, and crisis intervention. Bucyrus City School Superintendent Kevin Kimmel said, “Since the addition of on-site licensed counselors and social workers through CCSI, our district has seen a steady decline in the number of discipline referrals, suspensions, and expulsions.” He noted that the SOS education and screening program helps identify and address any potential issues that could lead students to harm themselves.

In addition, CCSI is a valued part of the corrections field at The Crawford County Justice Center. Crawford County Sheriff Scott Kent stated, “CCSI is always on call when we need them, after hours and on weekends.” They come to the Justice Center two to four days a week to do drug and alcohol

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Special to the Inquirer

This article was submitted by Crawford-Marion Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health (ADAMH).

This article was submitted by Crawford-Marion Board of Alcohol, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health (ADAMH).